8

Drizzling can't actually do any better than the theoretical resolving power of the combination of your telescope and the atmosphere. What it can do is at least partly compensate for having pixels that are too large to properly sample the resolution of your telescope + the atmosphere. The Nyquist Sampling Theorem basically says that you should have at least ...


6

Drizzling is just one technique in the field of super resolution imaging. Note that claims that you can't "pass the resolution limit" of a camera are wrong, in principle. In practice, it's really hard. What limits your ability to construct an image of what the camera is looking at are: the amount of random noise in the pixels, and your understanding of the ...


4

Those are probably just "hot pixels" that don't move on the sensor like the real stars do, so that the stacking spread them out in an arc. I don't think the software processes and treats each star separately, they can't be "skipped stars" mingled with "recognized stars". Notice that they are all 1 pixel wide, whereas stars are ...


4

I asked myself the same question and back then, I found the reasoning on the German Wikipedia page pretty comprehensive. I am translating, summarizing and expanding the corresponding section in the following: By using two mirrors instead of a single one has a couple of advantages: The double telescope collects the same amount of light as an 11.8-metre ...


3

B-modes in the raw CMB data can be caused by primordial gravitational waves, as well as by cosmic dust. After subtracting the cosmic dust polarization from the BCEP2 data, the residual signal is too weak with respect to noise to be statistically sufficiently significant to claim a discovery. Or stated in a different way: The observed B-modes can be ...


2

Dark Energy Survey data have yielded several TNO discoveries. Bernardinelli et al. 2020 describe their method in detail. First they compute a trial orbit from images where a transient object was detected. Then Final validation of the reality of linked orbits uses a new "sub-threshold confirmation" test, wherein we demand the object be detectable ...


2

The simple answer is that it isn't resolving in both orthogonal directions equally well. The horizontal dimension is the binocular dimension, and from looking at your animation, it looks to have about ~3 times the resolution. The horizontal banding, I'm pretty sure is not ringing, and is in fact, representative of additional information. This article does a ...


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