28

No more than the observation of light waves disproves quantum mechanics. Light has properties of both a particle and a wave. At low energies, the particle nature of light is hard to detect: radio waves are made of photons, but individual radio wave photons are pretty hard to detect. I'm not sure that we have directly detected individual photons with ...


22

The impact of this measurement on the status of quantum gravitation is exactly zero. The proper statement of the incompatibility of general relativity and quantum mechanics is that the quantum field theory of general relativity is not renormalizable. Renormalizability essentially means that the theory is well-defined at all energy scales, which seems like a ...


19

Another question, how can we identify the ripple's origin (let's say that if it's the result from the big bang or another big event)? (I'm just answering this part of the question, as James has already answered the main part about GR vs QM.) LIGO have produced an image which shows their best estimate of where these two black holes were: All they can say ...


14

I thought that the anti-particle was annihilating with "normal" mass inside the black hole? No? No. First, both particles and anti-particles have "normal" mass (should they have mass in the first place) and "normal" (positive) energy. The distinction between them is either a matter of convention or a question of which type is more common in the universe. ...


8

I'm not sure what you mean by saying that quantum gravity "doesn't exist". But because this is the Astronomy SE, I will interpret your question as primarily asking why astronomy hasn't found evidence of quantum gravity. This is a reasonable question; after all, nineteenth-century astronomers have found evidence of funny business in the perihelion precession ...


5

At the announcement press conference (2/11/2016), Kip Thorne said that the detection puts an upper limit on the rest mass of the graviton. They determined this limit by looking at distortions of the detected signal waveform compared to the idealized signal produced by computer simulations. The upper limit from the publication is $m_{graviton} < 1.2 × 10^{...


4

No. Or at least such an effect has never been observed, neither in the locality of the Earth or in light detected from distant sources. If a photon has an interaction with a quantum field (such as an electromagnetic field) this causes a scattering. Scattering would cause a blurring and dimming of distant sources. This is not observed. Such an effect, if ...


3

No. That's not what a black hole is. A black hole is a vacuum solution to general relativity. In other words a black hole is just mass, without a "thing" left to be massive. The mass is collapsed to a singularity, and is surrounded by an event horizon. If you pass over the event horizon, every path you can take in will lead you to the singularity. In this ...


3

Of course unknown "strange Quantum Effects" could do anything, but this letter reports calculations which suggest that at least one of the LIGO gravitational wave events is consistent with black holes but not with gravastars. That doesn't rule out the possibility of gravastars and black holes existing, but it speaks quite strongly against the idea that all ...


3

First, I'd like to point out and commend @user83692435's reply which came first and is correct. Expanding on it: The image of a virtual particle/anti-particle pair being created and then one of the pair being swallowed by the event horizon leaving the other as real is an analogy which provides a picture of what is happening, but is definitely not correct. ...


2

When inflation occurs the stretching of the gravitational field is dependent on the perturbations within that field originally. These perturbations are caused by quantum fluctuations. This leads to fluctuations in the magnitude of the inflation itself at a given point in space, causing gravitational waves due to the gravitational potential between ...


2

With the discovery of the Higgs Boson as the mass carrier, what is the possibility at the centre of a black hole being so dense and gravity so infinite that the structure of a proton or neutron are ripped apart into their fundamental elements by these extreme energies that Higgs Bosons are massed together at the centre, The center of a black hole is ...


1

Though the twin discovery of Gravitational Waves and Black Hole merger might not affect directly the status of QM it might indirectly bring new "surprises" For example, in this link: http://news.discovery.com/space/weve-detected-gravitational-waves-so-what-160213.htm They comment that: "For some reason, the final spin of the black hole is slower than ...


1

Quantum gravity could be the reason protons overcome the coulomb force and bond at the nucleus of an atom (strong force). If you extrapolate the mass energy of the plank units that fill up the volume of the proton nucleus it could satisfy the Schwarzschild condition, which is indeed, relatively quite a bit of gravity.


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible