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Most general purpose observatories release the data taken on their facilities after the expiration of the proprietary period (this is the time, typically 12-18 months, where the data is only available to the proposers for the telescope time so they can work on it without being "scooped"). "Focused telescopes" in the sense of those that are performing surveys ...


8

The closest service to what you are describing is the SIMBAD Astronomical Database from the Université de Strasbourg/CNRS. At the time I write this post, it contains 10.8M objects and 35.5M identifiers. It does not have a single CSV you can download with this information (to the best of my knowledge, and I've asked), but there is an API and TAP service ...


6

Arecibo recently opened the Arecibo Observatory Data Archive, which allows folks to obtain data organized by project. About 1800 proposals are listed, although not all of those have data available because not all of the observatory's data has been transferred to its new home at the Texas Advanced Computing Center. There's also an 18 month period during which ...


5

It looks like XEphem's format of databases as described in the manual's file format description. Does the filename end in .edb ? That is a common extension for these sort of files. Assuming it is, then the format breaks down as (taking the first line for example): A name (Akamar) A "type designation" for the sort of object, in this case f for fixed (as ...


5

Observations of stars near Sgr A* are done in the near-infrared, usually with adaptive optics. Most of these are done by two groups: Andrea Ghez's group at UCLA, using the Keck Telescopes in Hawaii, and Reinhard Genzel's group at MPE (Max-Planck-Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics), using the European Southern Observatory's Very Large Telescope (VLT) in ...


4

If you are looking for images of a particular moving object, the Solar System Object Image Search (SSOIS) at the Canadian Astronomy Data Centre (CADC) has indexed the Pan-STARRS collection. You can enter an object name, orbital elements, an arc or an ephemeris and find images of that object. https://www.cadc-ccda.hia-iha.nrc-cnrc.gc.ca/en/ssois/


4

There are two main datasets available from the PanSTARRS survey which are available from the archive at MAST/STScI. These are the Object Catalog, a (large) list of parameters such as position, brightness, shape etc (full list of catalog fields) and the Image Cutouts service which, well, cuts out sections of the images. (The survey went over the same patch of ...


4

Great project! and welcome to Stack Exchange. I'll post a short answer but I think someone can add a more detailed, thorough and insightful answer. I think that website is not well suited, so I'll answer based on you switching to Horizons. If you like Python then it's more fun to use Skyfield. If you want apply an equation based on a Kepler orbit model, you'...


3

I occasionally view the Earth illuminated side of the new and old moons with my Mallincam electronic eyepieces. Unlike the sun illuminated side there are no shadows in the view but the features do stand out quite clearly. There is little if any contrast across the view that the eye can perceive. Other than looking with the eye I have never attempted any ...


3

Shouldn't it be the other way around, that shorter wavelength telescopes like those in IR and the visible and UV generate more data because they have higher resolution per unit of aperture? This is a very interesting question! My answer is no, not currently, but someday it may be the case. Because we have big fast computer and fiber optic technology, we ...


3

The Python AstroML module might be interesting to you. It is accompanied by a textbook about machine learning applied to astronomical datasets, but if you don't have the cash to spend on the book, there are some exercises and datasets included in the module itself that should give you a lot to dig into.


3

A possibility might be a course at a university, youtube, or a self-study-course via a book. What we've used in our astrostatistics class was "Wall & Jenkins: Practical Statistics for Astronomers" which presents theoretical sections with exercises as follow-ups. No answer sections exist, as you need to do some programing for some of them. But you can ...


3

Red shift is usually measured for galaxies rather than individual stars. Unless a star has just gone supernova, it's usually not bright enough to be seen even w the world's most powerful telescopes at the distances where cosmological redshift comes into play. Hubble's law operates over large distances; the expansion constant being 67.8 km/sec per megaparsec (...


3

Kepler's first law is that a planet moves in an ellipse with the sun at one focus. Your equation is that of an ellipse about the focus, so, you have proven Kepler's first law. The $\varphi$ is what astronomers call true anomaly. To put your equation in the usual form, $a/b^2$ is $1/p$ so $$ r = \frac{p}{1+\epsilon cos\varphi}$$ With this equation, the ...


3

The areas of the sky covered by the major Near Earth Object (NEO) surveys are reported to the Minor Planet Center. You can plot visualizations of that sky coverage data using the sky coverage form where you can filter by depth, date and survey. The raw data is available, after the surveys give permission for it to be released, from the raw data page. This ...


2

As you’ve discovered, there are a lot of different catalogs out there, and many ways to search them. It would help if you could narrow your question a bit - what kind of data are you looking for? You seem to want stellar masses at least - what else? As noted above, there are few stars for which mass is measured directly, but there are robust ways of ...


2

You question reminded me of a tool I first encountered in the 80’s (I know right!) called “data thief”. Back when Mac applications had a four letter “creator code” this one had the code “DIEF” (which is the Dutch word for “thief”). I appears to be around still - and as it doesn’t rely on a browser it may well still work (I haven’t tried in years though). ...


1

If those data were available to the public, the Breakthrough Listen Open Data Archive would most likely have them. Queries there currently return no 982 MHz data for any sources, and "PROXCEN" data only at 3009 and 3094 MHz from 2017-18. This Scientific American article mentions work in progress by Sheikh et al.; they may have dibs on the 982 MHz ...


1

Not much will be visible in optical wavelength as the region will be too bright or nothing will be visible. You can observe in X-ray practically as black holes emit synchrotron radiation and that is visible in x-ray region pretty good. So you can write a proposal to CXO and make them understand your need to observe them Sag A* and they will allot you time. ...


1

Here is a good source of public data https://pds-imaging.jpl.nasa.gov/ . My fear is that without some basic astronomy courses, there will be many little hassles ( e.g. the coordinates expressed in spherical coordinates etc, and you might expect xyz. FITS format reader) for any new person. Be mentally ready for numerous small obstacles.


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