New answers tagged

0

The Vogt-Russell "theorem" says that the structure of a star is uniquely determined by its mass and the distribution of chemical elements within its interior. To answer your question, you need to decide what you are holding fixed. A star of a given mass and composition has a fixed radius. If you increase the mass you increase the radius. If you fix ...


0

For main sequence stars there is not much choice. If you pick mass, then all the rest is determined; any variation you see is due to different chemistry (thus fractions of different elements). For the main sequence one generally assumes that $L \propto M^{3.5}$ and $R \propto M^{2/3}$ (and similarily the density is given for a given mass). The Hertzsprung-...


3

This is a brief letter to Nature from 1946, containing no quantitative justification of the density estimate In 1946, whilst the radius of some of the nearest red dwarfs could be estimated from their luminosities and blackbody temperatures, there would be little information about masses. There is little else to say. Modern models and measurements of masses ...


8

Red dwarfs, depending on your definition, can range from 2.5 to 150 times more dense than the Sun. What is the cause of this discrepancy? They give no calculations, so I can only guess. The article is from 1946 and we've gotten a lot better at science. It's 1946 and information exchange is limited. No internet, no TV, and long distance calls are expensive....


Top 50 recent answers are included