6

There is the NIST Atomic Spectra Database where you could browse by elements. This the reverse approach, meaning that you have to first query element by element and then see which of the lines you find in the spectrum - that's how we used to do it in our labs during studies: Then, there is another NIST site where you can enter up to 4 spectral lines in ...


5

Finally, I managed to find such list (and even more): Meteoritical Bulletin. You can search for every location where at least one meteorite was found (including Mars and Moon). You can also choose among many other useful options. I found 15 on Mars and 2 on Moon, so I believe there are 17 extraterrestrial meteorites found.


4

8 AD was definitely a leap year. It was believed since Scaliger that the leap year sequence was (45), 42, 39 ... 12, 9 BC, AD 8, 12 ... This was based strictly on sources in literature. Chris Bennett claims that an astronomical papyrus published in 1999 (pOxy 61.4175) which gives lunar ephemeris in late 24 BC and implies that Scaliger was definitely wrong, ...


4

High School Senior Your first mission is to concentrate on getting a good set of results from high school. That really means not spending your time chasing astronomy and astrophysics yet. Yes, this is what your parents and teachers would say, but you know, if you ever want to have the time, resources and maybe the chance to study and/or work in these ...


4

Here is another alternative/supplement to NIST. The VALD atomic line database, which is specifically for astrophysical applications. I believe this database does contain some molecular data too.


4

If your goal is to learn about this, sure why not? The internet, books, tv you can learn. Turn this around, could an engineering student who, out of the the blue got an interest in literature but had no idea about "arts" or "the humanities" learn about literature? Sure, they could read some novels, go to some plays... They are unlikely ...


3

The closest that I know of would either be Nightwatch (Terence Dickinson) and/or The Backyard Astronomer's Guide (also Terence Dickinson). I don't think either of those cover your last requirement of "telescopes of all regions of the EM spectrum like Ultraviolet Telescopes, Infrared Telescopes, etc.", though.


3

You will need to know the mathematics. If you don't have the relevant mathematical background then understanding the physics would be hard because maths is the language of physics. If you can, start from calculus. "University physics" textbook by Young and Freedman covers basic concepts (you don't need everything but Newtonian physics, QM, SR and ...


2

Chodas and Yeomans published a paper called The orbital motion and impact circumstances of Comet Shoemaker-Levy 9. In it they describe the algorithms and techniques they used to reconstruct the orbit backwards from the discovery of the comet. SL9 had an incredibly chaotic orbit in the mathematical sense in that small perturbations in the position would ...


2

Tycho Brahe's original notebooks are kept in the Royal Library in Copenhagen. A digitized version is available here. I don't speak danish or latin, so I'm not sure if this is the only notebook he had, but it's the only one I could find on their website. "Tychonis Brahe Opera Omnia" just means "The Works of Tycho Brahe". It is a 15-volume ...


2

Learning is never a waste. Will the path be difficult? Not at all. Will the path be long and lots of work? You have no idea how long and how much work, starting from your foundation as undergraduate liberal arts! To start with, you will need at least first year college level maths. You need to be comfortable with scientific notation, exponents, geometry(...


1

I am an undergraduate in Physics, and I have an opportunity to work with a some of my seniors to learn Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) and Magnetohydrodynamics (MHD). Congrats! I would like to choose my first individual project in order to learn about how these techniques are used in Astrophysics. The answer to your question depends on what you mean ...


1

Computational Fluid Dynamics and Magnetohydrodynamics are very important in understanding the interior of stars, star formation, the interstellar medium, accretion discs around stars,... So to answer your first question, I would say this is a great opportunity and it would be very beneficial to learn about it through a hands-on project with more experienced ...


1

I found an article by Wendy L. Freedman Determination of cosmological parameters which contained the following graphics The corresponding references should be listed in the references of that paper References The online article is also published as Invited Review given at the Nobel Symposium, Particle Physics and the Universe, Haga Slott, Sweden, August, ...


1

Gravitational waves are a prediction of Einstein's general theory of relativity, so one should be well acquainted with special relativity first, and then become familiar with basics of general relativity, and then one will be well equipped to study gravitational waves. Luckily, this should not take a long time, since there are so many great resources for ...


1

My first approach would be to visit my local university library, ask for the physics section and look which books are available, e.g. with the title gravitational waves in the physics or science department. No need to read them completely, the first introductory sections are usually a good start. If you are not feeling like going to library, why not checking ...


1

As @ProfRob already stated, there is no single star database with all parameters. Here are some resources: SIMBAD Astronomical Database GAIA Archive "providing astrometry, photometry, and spectroscopy of more than 1000 million stars in the Milky Way." A helpful and extensive collection of online resources is collected as community wiki answer to ...


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