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Am I looking at the moon upside down here in the US? At latitudes greater than +/- 28.6° (let's say greater than +/- 40° to make this work easier) the Moon will always be either South or North of the zenith. Viewing the Moon from the northern US one will always be looking in some southernly direction, unless one faces north and does a back stand to look ...


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Some school playgrounds have bars high enough above the ground for kids to hang upsided down from if they wish. If you hang upside down from an outside bar and happen to see the Moon while doing so, you are looking at the moon (while you are) upside down. That is the only possible way for the phrase "looking at the moon upside down" to make sense. ...


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The moon and earth are tidally locked. So the whole human population only gets to see one half of the moon. P.S. Technically, due to angle differences, there will be a slight variation, but there will always be a land mass unvisited by people on earth,unless they build a spaceship, and therefore infamously called the 'Dark Side of the Moon'.


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The Moon orbits the Earth prograde. Looking from above the North Pole, the Earth spins counterclockwise and the Moon orbits counterclockwise. (As a result, shadows move clockwise, and the motion of clocks is based on the movement of the shadow in a sundial) The Moon's rotation is locked to its orbit. It is tidally locked. It rotates exactly once per month. ...


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No, it does not. For planets and moons, the IAU defines the north pole as the pole that shares the same half of the celestial sphere, relative to the invariable plane of the Solar System, as the Earth's north pole, so it wouldn't matter how the Moon rotated with respect to determining the Moon's north pole, just which direction that pole was pointing. That ...


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