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6

The page you link to contains what is, to my knowledge, the most descriptive graph of the signal from the RATAN-600 data that is open to the public. Bursov et al. have not yet presented their results, which will be explained at the International Academy of Astronautics SETI Permanent Committee meeting late this September. Chances seem to be good that we won'...


5

This hypothesis was put forth by Paris Antonio in the paper "Hydrogen Clouds from Comets 266/P Christensen and P/2008 Y2 (Gibbs) are Candidates for the Source of the 1977 “WOW” Signal". As you correctly suspected, he tested his theory in 2017 leading to the paper "HYDROGEN LINE OBSERVATIONS OF COMETARY SPECTRA AT 1420 MHZ". In this paper he claimed to have ...


4

This is like asking "can I spot polar bears from my back garden?" There is nothing that would stop a determined polar bear from coming into my garden, so it is not impossible. But unless you live in Churchill, its probably not going to happen. You can get a radio telescope, and it would be able to receive a sufficiently powerful signal. But detecting ...


4

You aren't missing anything. The pulsar map is fairly useless unless the spacecraft is found within the next million years, when it won't have got too far from the Sun (the probes will have travelled about 30 light years in that time). The problem is not so much that the set of pulsars won't be visible, because they almost certainly would be if you change ...


3

I recall hearing Professor Lovelock about 10 years ago, describing a discussion with his students in the 1960s - what observation would indicate life on another planet? They concluded that spectroscopic analysis would show that the chemistry of the planet was inconsistent with the planet's age. A slower than expected rate of entropy would indicate the ...


3

Send two pulses of whatever (light, radio) you are using for communication, one a factor of $\alpha$ longer than the other.


3

We have no idea how much we’ve been able to accomplish so far in the search for extraterrestrial intelligence. If there isn’t extraterrestrial intelligence then our progress is zero. If there is extraterrestrial intelligence and we already found some, then we’ve made 100% progress! I think the major obstacles for SETI are threefold: funding, stigma, and ...


3

Have the many exoplanets we've discovered in the last several decades improved our estimates of 𝑓𝑝, and 𝑛𝑐? Absolutely! The quantity $f_p n_e$ is a quantity of much interest in investigations of extrasolar planets, which effectively equates to the fraction of stars that have a habitable planet in their star's habitable zone. Plenty of studies have ...


2

We've already attempted to communicate with aliens (and I don't mean teenagers), notably using Voyager 1 and 2 and their "gold records". Any intelligent technological civilization should easy decode it (although I'm not sure what they could usefully make of the audio). Communicating a number is easy - finding aliens is the tricky part. :-) I ...


2

The data about the various bodies in the Solar System available from ground-based observations in that era was rather crude. Optical and radio telescopes have improved a lot since then. We now have various ways of compensating for the distortion due to Earth's atmosphere, and sophisticated computer techniques for enhancing the raw data. Sure, they could have ...


2

Sun-like yellow dwarf stars are generally thought to be the best places for intelligent life to develop, if only because 100% of known life is in orbit about a yellow dwarf. Larger, brighter stars don't last long enough for intelligence to evolve and red dwarf stars were thought to be too prone to solar flares. However yellow dwarf stars are relatively rare,...


2

Sure, but it is not straightforward. There's a lot of degeneracies involved, such as many molecules sharing similar absorption bands, the presence of clouds, scattering, absorption happening at many different pressure ranges, solving the chemical equilibirum equations of the species and the temperature-profile modifying the overall spectrum as well. There's ...


2

Try https://www.coursera.org/courses?query=astronomy Online courses from several universities. Some are on a schedule with online lectures, etc. Others you can just do yourself at any time. Also there are extensive libraries on YouTube, for instance from this guy Michel van Biezen. http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLX2gX-ftPVXWddG6sGq6H-3cN0IQzfQmG ...


2

The plot is pretty straight forward. 6EQUJ5 puts the peak signal between Q and U, closer to U. The letters represent two digit numbers, 1-9, then A-Z. A being 10, Z being 35. U was the highest signal strength received equivalent to a 30. A plot fits rather neatly. Wikipedia has a nice summary of the event. The location is discussed here with some ...


1

If those data were available to the public, the Breakthrough Listen Open Data Archive would most likely have them. Queries there currently return no 982 MHz data for any sources, and "PROXCEN" data only at 3009 and 3094 MHz from 2017-18. This Scientific American article mentions work in progress by Sheikh et al.; they may have dibs on the 982 MHz ...


1

It's unclear if nuclear energy would be a choice propulsion for a space faring civilization. It's possible, but it's not the only option. That said, if it was the method of choice, it's not at all clear to me that it would be easily detected. Let me preface this with stating that I'm not an expert. There's two kinds of basic nuclear engine that could ...


1

Short answer : Yes Long answer : Yes We have actually sent radio signals to distant exoplanets that are thought to be capable of hosting (hopefully intelligent) life. Some examples? The radio signal directed at a world 12 light-years away included music and math lessons from Earth Are There Any Habitable Exoplanets That Can Hear Us? The second link only '...


1

Extraterrestial intelligence is a hard research topic as the search for evidence is not straight forward in any way. The search for intelligent life as far as I know is limited to observations in radio and for that you want to see if any SETI members are UK based. However if you're more into astrobiology in general you might wanna look up the UK Centre for ...


1

The idea of Trottier & Borra is to analyze signals that might be hidden IN the stellar spectrum. I know this sounds weird; it did sound weird to me when I first heard of it too. You know how you can decompose light in diferent colors, right? Well, we astronomers like to think of colors in terms of wavelength (with $~4500$ Angstroms being blue and $~7000$...


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