19

Hmmm no, it wouldn't be cluttered with debris, and yes, it's a good idea to park the JWST (James Webb Space Telescope) at the Sun-Earth L2 point. The five Lagrange points are unstable, for one because of the gravitational anomalies of the two massive bodies of the Lagrange system, eccentric orbits, and there are many other factors to their instability. At ...


8

The Earth loses mass because hydrogen and helium (plus other elements in trace amounts compared to hydrogen and helium) escapes the Earth's atmosphere. The Earth gains mass because incoming asteroids (most of them very small) impact the Earth's atmosphere; a few make it all the way to the surface of the Earth. Whether those incoming asteroids burn up in the ...


7

The Earth has a net loss of mass each year. The infall of debris from space is more than matched mainly by the loss of hydrogen from the atmosphere. According to the BBC radio show More or Less the net annual loss of mass is ~50,000 tons/year.


3

Temperature is not the only factor for matter phases, pressure does make a difference too. As space is practically a vacuum, thus pressure is zero. As far as I know, there can be no liquids in the vacuum of space. No element nor compound is liquid in zero pressure no matter what the temperature might be. The best candidate for this would be Helium, but ...


3

If you are a beginning astronomer, there is not much point worrying about all the bells and whistles you can get with a good telescope. Instead, the key points to look for are: light-gathering diameter - this gives an indication of how dim an object you will be able to see supports/stand/mount - a basic tripod will be fine if you want to see no further ...


2

Comets are part of the meteor calculation. Space junk is a minor concern. Most satellite and rocket bodies are fairly flimsy and are destroyed by the atmosphere. Sometimes chunks do come down. But by the time they reach Earth they are not falling fast enough to form a significant crater. However being directly hit could be fatal. According to Mark ...


2

No known planet except Earth can be colonized by a human civilization. There are at least three serious issues: temperatures at around 300K, an atmosphere of appropirate pressure, and damaging cosmic radiation (low gravity is also a worry for long-term human presence). Minerals are less of a problem (and water can be synthesized). Mars and the Moon are close ...


2

The orbit is around L2 at a vast distance from it, perhas > 10,000 km around it. This is a map of the stability of the lagrangian points: L2 is unstable, like balancing a pencil on it's tip, but l4 and l5 have a force restoring a deprating object back onto L4. There is a lot les space debris at L2 that orbiting the earth, JWST has less chance of a hit ...


2

The Earth atmosphere protects us from small impacts from both asteroids and man made objects. This is well known from meteoroids, where meteoroids as large as a few tens of meters in diameter usually fail to penetrate into the lower atmosphere because they get fragmented and dispersed at high altitude. Fragmentation height depends mainly on the meteoroid ...


2

The force depends on the details of the collision. Depending on how hard the materials involved are, and the angles and everything, it might be a larger force for a shorter time, or a shorter force for a larger time. What are relatively predictable is the impulse -- force times time, essentially (or the integral of force over time, if you want to be exact) ...


1

The OP's clarifying comment under the question offers an opportunity to examine further: Do meteoroids really get that slow? I estimate its speed at about 1/6 that of a typical shower meteor. The apparent or angular speed of an object in the upper atmosphere depends on several things, including the actual linear speed in say km/sec the distance from ...


1

The solar system IS surrounded by a cloud of debris,left over from its formation. This debris is called the Oort Cloud,& consists of thousands of comet-like bodies,sometimes described as dirty snowballs. None of the known major planets passes through them,but a few years ago some astronomers seemed certain that they had detected signs of a 9th major ...


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