9 votes
Accepted

If 50 tons or more of debris falls to earth everyday, is Earth getting heavier?

The Earth loses mass because hydrogen and helium (plus other elements in trace amounts compared to hydrogen and helium) escapes the Earth's atmosphere. The Earth gains mass because incoming asteroids (...
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7 votes

If 50 tons or more of debris falls to earth everyday, is Earth getting heavier?

The Earth has a net loss of mass each year. The infall of debris from space is more than matched mainly by the loss of hydrogen from the atmosphere. According to the BBC radio show More or Less the ...
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3 votes

Parking a telescope at a Lagrange point: is this a good idea from a debris point of view?

The orbit is around L2 at a vast distance from it, perhas > 10,000 km around it. This is a map of the stability of the lagrangian points: L2 is unstable, like balancing a pencil on it's tip, but l4 ...
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3 votes
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Can a liquid be used to de orbit debris?

Temperature is not the only factor for matter phases, pressure does make a difference too. As space is practically a vacuum, thus pressure is zero. As far as I know, there can be no liquids in the ...
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2 votes

At what size do objects burn up in the atmosphere when falling from orbit?

The Earth atmosphere protects us from small impacts from both asteroids and man made objects. This is well known from meteoroids, where meteoroids as large as a few tens of meters in diameter usually ...
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2 votes

What is the probability of an astronomical body hitting you?

Comets are part of the meteor calculation. Space junk is a minor concern. Most satellite and rocket bodies are fairly flimsy and are destroyed by the atmosphere. Sometimes chunks do come down. But ...
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2 votes

Force exerted by space debris on satellites

The force depends on the details of the collision. Depending on how hard the materials involved are, and the angles and everything, it might be a larger force for a shorter time, or a shorter force ...
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1 vote
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Did I see a meteor(oid) or space debris or something else?

The OP's clarifying comment under the question offers an opportunity to examine further: Do meteoroids really get that slow? I estimate its speed at about 1/6 that of a typical shower meteor. The ...
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1 vote

If a solar system were surrounded by a cloud of debris, is it possible for a planet's orbit to intersect it?

The solar system IS surrounded by a cloud of debris,left over from its formation. This debris is called the Oort Cloud,& consists of thousands of comet-like bodies,sometimes described as dirty ...
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