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Let's pretend we have a mirror in the shape of a spherical cap, with dimensions the same as JWST: diameter d=6.5m and radius of curvature r=15.88m. Then the distance along the surface of the mirror between two opposite points on its rim is given by 2r arcsin (d/2r), which comes to about 6.546m. This is only about 0.7% longer than the straight-line distance d....


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The JWST images will have various artifacts. I found a web page that summarises the situation for the Near Infrared Imager and Slitless Spectrograph (NIRISS). The image below (taken from that webpage) shows simulated point sources as they would appear on the detector (including the sampling by the 0.0656 arcsec pixels). The greyscale is on a logarithmic ...


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Sources above: https://www.facebook.com/NASAWebb/photos/10158883840795049/ below: https://jwst-docs.stsci.edu/jwst-observatory-hardware/jwst-telescope Do telescope measurements (in meters, usually) measure in a straight line, from edge to edge, or follow the curve of the mirror? The short answer is @JamesK's; it's the straight-line diameter of whatever ...


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Straight line, though it wont make much difference, The point about the size is that it tells you about how much light the telescope can gather. This is the "projected-flat" area, not the curved surface area. However, the difference is not much, as telescope mirrors are not highly curved. I suppose it makes more of a difference when considering ...


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In addition to the target list linked to by @planetmaker in their answer, there are two recently published review articles (from Nature Astronomy) summarizing the many different aspects of Solar System science that were done with Spitzer: Lisse et al. (2020), "Spitzer's Solar System studies of comets, centaurs and Kuiper belt objects" Trilling et ...


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All "big" instruments have observation logs, so does Spitzer. The complete logs are here but there's also a filtered log for solar system observations which shows basically all planets and especially many minor planets. That said, it's not a general sky survey telescope due to its FOV of 5' x 5', so it's not meant to discover objects in ...


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a "tentative answer". I did not find that the accelerometer was installed this satellite. On the contrary, I found a number of articles on improving the accuracy of the satellite position with mathematical methods. For example string "Ballistic and navigation support for “Spektr-R” spacecraft" for googling. 1/ 1.In russian The paper ...


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