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Building on the answers from @anders-sandberg and @ProfRob I think I get an answer for my own question. I am most certainly reinventing the wheel, but it has been fun. Please comment or edit if you know any pointer on a similar derivation. As a (very) rough approximation, one may assume that in a given line of sight, there is locally a uniform, independent ...


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So, the big bang started 13.7 billion years ago, and for the next 380,000 years, the universe expanded and cooled, so atoms could start forming later on. 13,685,000,000 years ago, the early universe was too hot and dense for liquid water to form. So, the answer is NO, liquid water could not form about 15 million years after the big bang. Hoping this was ...


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Let's interpret your question to be about whether the conditions would permit blobs of water to remain liquid, whether or not water existed yet. And the answer is No, because the pressure was by then far too low. Basically, space was already a vacuum, just not as hard a vacuum as intergalactic space is now. It is appealing to imagine an era when the universe ...


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As others have mentioned in the comments, there wouldn't have been any oxygen to form water. Soon after the Big Bang, the protons were hot or dense enough to fuse up to helium and some lithium but nothing heavier. Heavier elements were eventually fused in the first stars and partially dispersed in space by their winds and when they exploded as supernovae, ...


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