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6 votes
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How can I convert my sky coordinate system (RA, Dec) into galactic coordinate system (l, b)?

Applying spherical trigonometry, it follows that the conversion from equatorial coordinates $\alpha$ and $\delta$ to galactic coordinates $l$ and $b$ is: $$\left. \begin{aligned} \sin b &=\sin \...
Albert's user avatar
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4 votes
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Discrepancies in the equations for converting Horizontal coordinates to Equatorial coordinates

According to the old nomenclature, the azimuth $A_s$ was defined starting from the South towards the West, from 0º to 360º (SWNE direction). If $a$ = altitude, (not zenith angular distance = $z$) and $...
Albert's user avatar
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2 votes

Finding stars that would be visible from satellite

Here is my attempt to accomplish this using Astropy's Working with Earth Satellites Using Astropy Coordinates example, in the hopes that it will at least be something to check against / compare with. ...
Roy Smart's user avatar
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2 votes
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Angular distance calculation in Equatorial and Galactic coordinates

(1) Distance between 2 points, knowing their equatorial coordinates: Galactic Center: Note that $\alpha_1=271.087458^o$ and $\delta_1=-29.519139^o$ are not correct values. According Galactic ...
Albert's user avatar
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2 votes

How can I convert my sky coordinate system (RA, Dec) into galactic coordinate system (l, b)?

This can be pretty easily accomplished in astropy using the following code: ...
Roy Smart's user avatar
  • 1,632
1 vote

Celestial Coordinates / Spherical Trigonometry problem

Assuming the observer is stationary, in 532 minutes (9h2m-10m) the star's GHA will have changed by 133 degrees. The star's GP will have changed by 11.8 degrees. A spherical triangle with vertices at ...
stretch's user avatar
  • 1,797

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