23

Note: this answer was posted under duress; though I mentioned in a comment under the question that I was composing an answer, several users have decided to close the question out from under me. Therefore I've put this together a little hastily. It's late here and I'll come back in the morning to address any questions or requests for clarification, and ...


18

What you describe is a technique called averted vision and takes advantage of the arrangement of cones and rods, two types of light sensitive elements within the eye: The retina contains two types of photoreceptors, rods and cones. The rods are more numerous, some 120 million, and are more sensitive than the cones. However, they are not sensitive to ...


9

Currently Polaris is at a declination of a bit over 89 degrees, which means that no one south of 1 degree south latitude can see Polaris. That's almost all of the Southern hemisphere, let alone the South Pole. Polaris won't be the North Star forever, thanks to axial precession. In about 13000 years or so, Polaris will have a declination of about 46 degrees ...


8

You can tell a lot about Galactic structure by just looking. The ~5000 stars that can be seen with the naked eye have a roughly "lognormal" distribution of distance. I show plots below which were generated from the most recent version of the Hipparcos parallax catalogue. Fig.1 shows results for all stars with $5.5<V<6.5$ (i.e. very faint naked eye ...


8

A good question, and in the early 2000s John Bortle published a categorization of a variety of conditions, with descriptions for each category. It is the commonly used scale to describe to others the sort of conditions at a location. Probably one of the more significant factors provided by a dark sky site is: how faint do stars have to be for you not to ...


7

There is a "South Star" called Sigma Octanis located in the constellation Octans, but it is so dim that virtually nobody calls it the south star. Just another side note: Polaris doesn't always point North. The reason is that our Earth has a precession effect which make the North pole circulate around the sky. This picture illustrates my point. EDIT: Just ...


7

While the majority of the celestial sky is visible on both hemispheres, you are not able to see Polaris on the south pole, since Polaris is pointing directly towards the north pole. I know that during winter time, you can definitely just see the plough/big dipper (part of the Ursa Major constellation) as far south as Uluru/Ayers Rock in Australia, but that ...


6

If you have yet to plan your adventure and the moon is not you main target, be sure to set your date nearest a "New Moon". During this phase the moon will not be visible at night, reducing the light pollution that much more. This will increase the amount of stars you should be able to see. Peak of any meteor shower event would be a bonus aswell. Red light ...


5

The common explanation is linked to the eye structure: in the center of the eye, you have mostly cones, that are used to detect colors and that are efficient only in bright light (that's why we don't see colors so well during the night). The rest of the eye contains more rods, that are used to detect dim light and contrast. So the best way to observe some ...


5

Stars with an apparent magnitude of 7.0 or greater are typically not visible to the naked eye. So if you take a list of exoplanetary host stars, such as this, and you sort by apparent magnitude, in ascending order, then you will see a list of identifiable stars known to have exoplanets, until you reach an apparent magnitude of 7.0 on the list. Finding the ...


5

Judging by the time of your post, I would probably say the star you saw was Aldebaran as it was very close to the moon on that night. It's the brightest star in the constellation Taurus so is easily seen close to the moon, where the moonlight washes out the dimmer stars around it. It is normally seen red/orange to the naked eye but atmospheric interference ...


5

Does Polaris have a trail in the sky timelapse? Yes. Every star has a trail, but it's smaller if it's closer to the pole. Polaris is close to the pole but it's still 45 (arc)minutes away. I don't think it's visible with the naked eye; no star trail is visible with the naked eye as you only see one 'instance' of the sky. What perhaps would work, and is more ...


4

The other answers have some good points: Lack of light pollution does make for much better skies, and higher elevation does help by eliminating some of the obscuring atmosphere (of course, you need to be careful how high you go and how quickly, as lack of oxygen can cause problems of several sorts). I'd like to add a couple things: Obviously, obstructions ...


4

Ok go on Stellarium then hover over the left side of the screen afterwards click on the location and select London, England (City Of London is the original walled city), then go and hover over the left side of the screen and select sky and viewing options and in the sky section and select the air pollution level from location database then it will ...


4

The sun would appear roughly half-way between Capella and the W of Cassiopeia. The constellations are a human invention, and don't correspond to actual groups of stars. Since all the nearby stars would be in somewhat different positions the constellations would be mixed up, for example, Sirius would be close to Betelgeuse. You can't really talk about ...


3

It appears to be an older version of the Bushnell Voyager Sky Tour 800x70mm Refractor Telescope Full manual here


3

At the South pole no stars north of the celestial equator will be visible. The general equations of the declination limit at a given latitude: declination limit = $latitude - 90$ (for the northern hemisphere, $latitude > 0$) declination limit = $90 + latitude$ (for the southern hemisphere, $latitude < 0$)


3

The site in-the-sky.org has a wide variety of functions and options. In Planetarium mode, I chose a random city at about 24N and in the middle, which helps to get the correct UTC + 05:30 India Time Zone, and then just put in the time and date and turned on alt/az grid. So it is likely to have been Jupiter, as you suspect. Below are two screen shots - 20:...


3

You can use an application that shows the stars at any time and location. Stellarium is free, has nice features and isn't too complicated. You can select a star/constellation and flip through the time of day and through the days to see how its elevation changes over time. In general, everyone with the same latitude sees the same sky at a certain date (...


3

There are apps which will help guide you to more significant stars (Google skymap comes to mind if you're looking for a simple mobile system - Stellarium may also be a good option), but it's highly unlikely that any app will include the location and names of so-called 'personal' stars, as the bodies who sell such things don't have any the authority to do so ...


3

Yes, altitude does play a role. The higher you go, less photons from civilization will reach you, as most of it will be scattered by dust in the air. Also, as to answer "what qualifies as a good place", as if you are asking for a criterion, a popular one is : "If you can see all the stars of Little Dipper, well that's a 'good' place to observe".


3

Firstly, the galaxy is only about 1000ly thick. We are fairly close to the galactic plane, maybe around 65 ly 'above' it if we call the direction we are moving away from 'down'. So on your assumption that visible objects are all within about 1000ly, we can suppose that we should see more stars in the plane than above and below the plane, as there is only ...


3

You may be out of luck. If you live pretty much anywhere in the North East, there are very few locations where you can see a truly dark sky. You might be able to get somewhere where you can see the faint glow of the milky way band, but to see a really dark sky, you pretty much have to be out west in the middle of no where. One resource to help you out is to ...


3

The Milky Way will be in a straight line that goes from SSW, (a bearing of about 200 degrees) almost directly overhead and to the NE. The brightest part of the Milky way will be low in the sky in the SSW. In future, you can check the visibility and direction of any astronomical object with planetarium software, such as the (free) Stellarium.


3

Polaris is about 1 degree from the celestial North Pole. An image with sufficient magnification and sufficient exposure time will show a (short) trail for Polaris. The difference between the images is the magnification and the exposure time and Magnification. The first image appears to have been about 10 hour exposure (actually a multiple exposure) The Last ...


3

My favorite resource for this sort of thing is the Skymaps.com evening sky map. The southern hemisphere edition is drawn for 35°S latitude. The November issue doesn't show the Milky Way, which hugs the horizon at that time. However, both the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds are well placed in the evening, and the back page lists several other objects "...


3

I concur with those by Mike G but add : eta Carina region: Milky Way between Southern and false cross. Most spectacular region apart from near Scorpius Sagittarius region Omega Centauri globular: morning sky north of Southern Cross. the Coal Sack: next to Southern Cross Kappa Crux "jewel box" probably too small in binoculars. next to Cross on coal sack side ...


2

It could have been an Iridium Satellite. Their solar panels are at an angle such that the sun reflects off them causing them to look like a bright flash that crosses the sky for a few seconds. I use a site called Heavens Above that allows you to enter your exact location so you can see what objects appear above, at what time and in what direction. Check ...


2

I use a 20x80 binocular on a tripod and I cannot make out Jupiter's bands. I believe that a 15x70 binocular will not be adequate.


2

Alternatively, if you were to get the Right Ascension and Declination coordinates from the company that sold you the star you could use a database like SIMBAD to find the actual designation of the star you purchased. You could then probably use the SIMBAD designation to find the star using Stellarium. Here's a link to the SIMBAD database: http://simbad.u-...


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