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Short Answer: The most stars in a known system are seven, and eight seems like the theoretical maximum. But it is possible that in extreme situations stable systems with more than seven stars might be theoretically possible. Long Asnwer: Part One of Four: Stable Str Systems are Hierarchical. In stable star systems the orbits of individual stars and pairs of ...


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Either three, or unbounded, depending on your definition. A three-star system would be one of the stable solutions to the n-body problem: a large star dominating the system, a smaller star orbiting it, and a very small star (eg. a red dwarf) in the smaller star's L4 or L5 point. In the unbounded case, you have two stars orbiting a common center of mass (a ...


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There is no true upper bound. You could argue that a galaxy is a vast multiple star system, with hundreds of billions of stars. Natural galaxies are not perfectly stable (random encounters eject stars over very long timescales), but one can construct stable systems by taking pairs of similar-mass binaries and placing them into a remote circular orbit around ...


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TL;DR: No, not always, but most of the time. Well, most planets are in either an equatorial orbit (~0° in relation to the star's rotation vector / equator). Some are in polar orbit (~90° and almost perpendicular to the star's equator/rotation vector), and even fewer are in retrograde or strange (highly eccentric or inclined) orbits. For example, all the ...


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The spectral type of a star is determined by looking at its spectrum. Sometimes authors will use other, approximate, relationships between spectral type and colour or mass, or they will look at the spectrum compared with standard templates in different wavelength regions. These are all possible reasons why different sources might suggest slightly different ...


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$\eta$ Cassiopeiae A has an estimated mass of 0.972 M$_\odot$, an estimated temperature of 5973 K, and a B-V color index of ~0.58[1]. In addition to the spectrum of the star, we look at these and other properties when attempting to classify main sequence stars. You can see a table [here] which shows the bulk properties of each spectral type that we can use ...


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