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4

Along with the other answers, which differ, about the loudness of the Sun there is information available about what it actually sounds like. I would describe it as as varying humming with static. Listen to the raw audio in this NASA video: "NASA | Sun Sonification (raw audio)", a narrated version by NASA Goddard: "Sounds of the Sun", or visit Goddard Media ...


0

You could plot $L$ vs $T$ and compare your model result to the measured/estimated $L$ and $T$ of main sequence stars? You have not explained or labelled what your diagram is, but it isn't $L$ versus $T$; I suspect that it absolute $V$ magnitude versus $B-V$ colour. The transformations between $L,T$ and $V$, $B-V$ are highly non-linear, especially at low ...


6

It's important to realize that binary stars form much differently than planets do. Assuming that both stars form in situ (i.e. excluding scenarios where one is captured from outside the system), there are several main ways for a binary star system to form from a molecular cloud. The most widely-accepted model at the moment is the fragmentation hypothesis, ...


3

"Iron stars" are a hypothetical kind of stellar remnant - similar to a neutron star or white dwarf - that are hypothesized to form in the far future of a Universe undergoing heat death, under the assumption that protons do not decay, which is something that we do not know if is or is not the case. Some of the more promising theoretical models for proton ...


4

Here is a table taken from the models of Siess et al. (2000). It is appropriate for zero age main sequence stars of about the solar metallicity. Note that any correspondence between spectral type, mass and radius will be age dependent. You can generate tables for different metallicities, or get more detailed information at http://www.astro.ulb.ac.be/~siess/...


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