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7

Unfortunately, the answer is "No", because accretion rates are far too low -- and our ability to measure black hole masses is far too uncertain -- for this to be visible in reasonable times. Given our current ability to measure black hole masses, you'd typically have to wait millions or tens of millions of years to see any accretion-related changes....


5

Formally, black holes are a prediction of Einstein's theory of gravity. They have been observationally confirmed. Regarding theory: The field equations of Einsteinian gravity, the Einstein Field Equations, admit solutions. The first closed form solution of these equations was found in 1916 by Karl Schwarzschild which is the massive non-rotating, uncharged ...


8

The answer is reasonably simple: (nearly) all matter consists of protons, neutrons and electrons, thus of either positively, or negatively charged particles or those with no charge. The next step you need to make is to assume that for some reason whatsoever a black hole accretes more protons than electrons (or vice versa). Such process might be envisionable, ...


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