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2

Nothing can be stationary inside the event horizon and everything, even light must travel inwards. Therefore there is no way that your analogy can work and is why using the idea of escape velocity is a really bad idea in General Relativity. i.e. You cannot be at a fixed $r$ coordinate to lift a weight. You must be falling inwards, as must any weight you lift,...


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One way to think about the interior of a black hole is that it is as if the singularity is coming up at you at faster than the speed of light. Even if you shine a beam of light straight up, the singularity will come up behind it and eat it. This may sound like I am talking nonsense, but consider a Kruskal-Szekeres diagram. In the diagram at the Wikipedia ...


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The trajectory of a ballistic body, whether in Newtonian or Relativistic physics depends on the initial energy and angular momentum. The difference is that in Newtonian physics, if the mass is compact enough, the infalling object (if given an initial kinetic energy) will never hit the central object, unless it is a direct hit, and will scatter off to ...


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Yes, definitely. While some matter returns to the galaxy as a so-called "galactic fountain" (e.g. Biernacki & Teyssier 2018), some material is ejected at super-escape velocity, becoming part of the intergalactic medium. This is one of the mechanisms responsible for polluting the intergalactic medium (IGM) with metal-rich gas (i.e. elements ...


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