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Nickel 56 decays to Cobalt 56 via electron capture decay, with a half-life of 6.1 days and a decay constant of $\lambda = 1.31\times 10^{-6}$ s$^{-1}$. About 1.75 MeV of energy is lost as gamma rays and a further 0.41 MeV in the form of an electron neutrino (Nadyozhin 1994) Let's assume that we are talking about the period of time after the initial ...


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Okay, yes, this was the way I went about it, and it seems satisfactory enough. Just use a nuclear physics reference (or Google) to get the isobar masses: $M_{^{56}Ni} = 55.9421u$ $M_{^{56}Co} = 55.9398u$ Then you have $\Delta m=0.0023u=(0.0023)(931.5\frac{MeV}{c^2})=2.14245\frac{MeV}{c^2}$ and thus the energy per decay is $2.14245MeV$. From here, just figure ...


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tl;dr No additional data of interest, but I explain how I searched, and I can explain the green color. It seems that there have not been any additional observations of that object, which perhaps isn’t too surprising given how faint it is - 21st magnitude is possible only with big telescopes. Simbad lists that object under the name of “EQ J103712-274051” but ...


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