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4

A Type Ia supernova (SNIa) also normally leaves "nothing behind" (that is no dense remnant; all the material of the stars involved gets dispersed into space.) This phenomenon involves one or two white dwarf stars, in which a significant fraction of the material (initially usually carbon and oxygen; although a substantial fraction of He, Ne, Mg can ...


4

WD+NS collision cannot leave nothing behind. Gravitational mass defect of NS is ~10% of its rest mass -- thus whatever energy released in the collision cannot disrupt the NS. The energy released is basically the nuclear energy of the WD material burning into heavier elements as it gets heated in the process of collision. That amounts to at most ~0.2% of the ...


11

It is fundamentally a question of spectral lines. Type I supernovae have no hydrogen lines, and type II have strong hydrogen lines. Type 1b have strong helium lines and no hydrogen lines, and type 1c have neither helium nor hydrogen lines. That’s why they aren’t designated as type II supernovae. The reason why type 1b and 1c supernovae have no hydrogen lines ...


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