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I have a much different answer. I'm taking a course in Astrophysics and the instructors took the approach of using the amount of iron in our galaxy to calculate the number of SN since galaxy was formed. They found how many SN it would take to produce that much iron. According to their calculations you need about 1 SN every 50 years from the Milky Way.


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The rate is evolving with time (and consequently with redshift). According to a paper in 2005 by Evan Scannapieco & Lars Bildsten (https://arxiv.org/abs/astro-ph/0507456), the rate of SNe Ia is 1 to 3.5×104 per yr per Mpc3 at z=2, which is the peak rate. You can very roughly consider it as 1 to 3.5 events in a galaxy in 10,000 years. Considering there ...


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There is a lot of scope to provide a very detailed answer here. The rate depends on what sort of a galaxy you are considering and when, what its star formation rate is (or was) and what its total stellar mass is. A good reference is the Annual Review of Astrophysics article by Maoz et al. (2019). This says that for a Sbc galaxy like the Milky Way, the ...


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There is an article here that describes the visible effects quite well. In essence, within a week or so, it would be comparable in brightness to the moon and therefore visible during the day. Betelgeuse would then start a phase of final, rapid dimming and again reach its current brightness level after possibly three years. After six years, it would be ...


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From Wikipedia: The visual light curves of the different supernova types all depend at late times on radioactive heating, but they vary in shape and amplitude because of the underlying mechanisms, the way that visible radiation is produced, the epoch of its observation, and the transparency of the ejected material. The light curves can be significantly ...


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The connection between the dimming and a putative supernova relies on the interpretation that the decrease in luminosity may be due to circumstellar material, ejected in the years/decades/centuries immediately preceding a supernova. There are several mechanisms that could lead to this sort of mass loss (see slides 24-25), including gravity-wave driven ...


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tl;dr - The main measurable effect may be minor climate cooling, but in day-to-day life, the only difference would be that we see a cool, bright explosion in the sky, and eventually, Orion becomes "incomplete". The effects would likely be quite minimal. What Will Happen When Betelgeuse Goes Supernova? by Corey S. Powell, former editor in chief of Discover ...


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Potentially a short (less than a second) burst of gravitational waves (GWs) would be detected. Much depends on asymmetries in the core collapse, since a spherically (or even axially) symmetric collapse would not produce GWs (e.g. Morozova et al. 2019). However, theoretical models suggest that the GWs start at low frequency (tens of Hz) and are associated ...


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Various issues in your question: Betelgeuse is currently undergoing a "low-state" period, which is the combined effect of two periodic variations (See for instance http://www.astronomerstelegram.org/?read=13365). Hence, there is no clear evidence right now that it will blow up as a core-collapse supernova, say, wihtin the next months. We are able to know if ...


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