New answers tagged

8

GrapefruitIsAwesome has already explained why the sky is significantly larger than 3300 square degrees; I'd like to explain why the sky coverage is precisely the value it is. The wording is admittedly not ideal. The portion of the sky visible to the surveys are limited by 1) dust in the Galactic plane that prevents them from observing extragalactic sources ...


16

The whole sphere has approximately 41,253 square degrees of solid angle. $$4\pi\left(\frac{180}{\pi}\right)^{2}\approx 41,253$$ so for a hemisphere there should be half this number or about 20,627 deg2. I think you computation is missing the $4\pi$ steradians in a sphere term. This doesn't solve the disparity however. Perhaps the key is the term "...


5

From various sources such as Wikipedia, NASA, and various published papers, an orbital resonance is: when orbiting bodies exert regular, periodic gravitational influence on each other, usually because their orbital periods are related by a ratio of small integers So a ratio of $1:\sqrt{2}$ wouldn't count. What's more it wouldn't even make sense to talk ...


9

Consider a child on a stationary swing. The fastest way to get them going is to push once every time they swing (a 1:1 resonance). If you push 581 times for every 137 swings, the pushes will mostly average out and the child won't get very high on the swing. Similarly, there are infinitely many orbital resonances possible, but when the integers in the ...


3

I don't think you are correct. If the resonance can be calculated exactly, then it's a resonance. Chaotic orbits cannot be calculated exactly, as they depend critically on initial conditions. Perhaps if the calculated fraction had an irrational num or denom, then you could claim "chaos" because the fraction itself can't be evaluated exactly.


0

Here is a partial answer to your question: A word for the period between two successive events with satellites in the same relative position should be similar to "synodic period". The synodic period incorporates not only the orbital relation to the parent star, but also to other celestial objects, making it not a mere different approach to the ...


Top 50 recent answers are included