New answers tagged

6

The Hill sphere radius of Pluto is about $r$ = 6 million km. Most of the Kuiper belt is in prograde motion around the Sun (like Pluto). Pluto's average speed is under a lazy 5 km/s for an orbital period of about 248 years. If the difference in orbital speed between Pluto and an average KBO is just 1 km/s, then Pluto will "sweep out" $\pi r^2 *86,...


2

To directly answer your question, the other answer is correct: The United States Geologic Survey's Astrobiology office handles ad hoc US submissions to the International Astronomical Union's nomenclature committee, so their form is what you would need to fill out. Nomenclature across the solar system has been set by the IAU to follow themes based on ...


4

You use this from https://planetarynames.wr.usgs.gov/FeatureNameRequest. You need to follow the rules as set out in https://planetarynames.wr.usgs.gov/Page/Rules as well as following the themes for naming Moon based features https://planetarynames.wr.usgs.gov/Page/Categories.


2

In the linked article by A. Bouchard and another by J. Daley, the words "in the journal Lunar and Planetary Science" link not to a journal article but to a poster in a K-12 education session at the 2017 Lunar and Planetary Science Conference. First author Kirby Runyon told Universe Today in 2017 that he would not submit this geophysical definition ...


1

Heliocentric longitude is a direction, not a date. A Heliocentric longitude of 0 is the direction from the sun towards the vernal equinox (currently in Pices) You can ask for the date on which the Earth is at a particular Heliocentric longitude. A careful calculation would require accounting for the eccentricity of the Earth's orbit, and also adjusting for ...


Top 50 recent answers are included