New answers tagged

6

A lunar module has a diameter of about 4m. At a distance of 400,000 km, this subtends an angle of 0.002 arcseconds. The absolute best you can do from the surface of the Earth, using massive telescopes and adaptive optics imaging is about 0.1 arcsecond. i.e. You cannot resolve anything on the Moon's surface, using a telescope on Earth, that is much smaller ...


0

Yes, As the moon more or less follows the same path as the sun in the sky, from the poles the moon will be above the horizon for two weeks then below the horizon for two weeks, so the answer to this question is yes.


4

Stumbled across this a year later, but thought I'd post a simple, non-math answer. The Moon's gravitational influence on the Earth is like that of any orbiting body on its primary, to wit that it creates a bulge in the Earth's surface, and to a lesser extent vice versa. As the Earth rotates that bulge moves around its circumference so it always points ...


4

Unfortunately, there was a server problem in the days leading up to the exciting Mars occultation. (It didn't matter to me because it was, unfortunately, cloudy where I live.) This description of the colored lines is from a temporary page provided by IOTA: The turquoise curves show where the disappearance or reappearance occurs at moonrise (left side) ...


3

I will answer the specific case of the Moon disappearing since the more general question, is a bit open-ended. Of course the Moon cannot just "disappear." However, there are very real circumstances where a planet or other stellar object might be disrupted. The best example I can think of is if a sufficiently large asteroid or moon from another planet ...


75

As planets get farther from the Sun, the Sun takes up a smaller part of the sky. The Sun is about 31 arc-minutes when viewed from Earth, but just 6-7 from Jupiter and 3-4 from Saturn. Less than 2 from Uranus and about 1 arc-minute from Neptune, not much bigger than Venus appears from Earth when Venus is visibly large in the sky and when Venus transits the ...


5

The Moon does move monotonically eastward relative to the Sun. However, for observers at temperate latitudes, they rise and set at a slant, so any difference in declination affects the lengths of time they are above the horizon. From Boston on 2020-01-24, the Moon is about 3° south of the Sun, making the time between moonrise and moonset about 28 ...


7

Right now, the moon is south of the ecliptic (for those of us in the northern hemisphere). This means it encounters the horizon before the sun.


Top 50 recent answers are included