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No, it isn't. Our senses, including vision, do not operate in the manner in which artificial, digital devices operate. Our eyes do not contain "pixels", nor is the image we are perceiving through our eyes composed of "pixels". Our nervous system also does so much post-processing of the image that any of these non-comparisons are ...


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The moon does go counterclockwise around the earth (viewed from above the earth's north pole). And both the moon and the earth rotate that way too. But that means that the moon's north pole is at the top when viewed from the US, not the bottom. You are 100% correct that, if you go to the southern hemisphere, the moon is upside down as compared to the ...


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Am I looking at the moon upside down here in the US? At latitudes greater than +/- 28.6° (let's say greater than +/- 40° to make this work easier) the Moon will always be either South or North of the zenith. Viewing the Moon from the northern US one will always be looking in some southernly direction, unless one faces north and does a back stand to look ...


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Some school playgrounds have bars high enough above the ground for kids to hang upsided down from if they wish. If you hang upside down from an outside bar and happen to see the Moon while doing so, you are looking at the moon (while you are) upside down. That is the only possible way for the phrase "looking at the moon upside down" to make sense. ...


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The moon and earth are tidally locked. So the whole human population only gets to see one half of the moon. P.S. Technically, due to angle differences, there will be a slight variation, but there will always be a land mass unvisited by people on earth,unless they build a spaceship, and therefore infamously called the 'Dark Side of the Moon'.


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The Moon orbits the Earth prograde. Looking from above the North Pole, the Earth spins counterclockwise and the Moon orbits counterclockwise. (As a result, shadows move clockwise, and the motion of clocks is based on the movement of the shadow in a sundial) The Moon's rotation is locked to its orbit. It is tidally locked. It rotates exactly once per month. ...


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No, it does not. For planets and moons, the IAU defines the north pole as the pole that shares the same half of the celestial sphere, relative to the invariable plane of the Solar System, as the Earth's north pole, so it wouldn't matter how the Moon rotated with respect to determining the Moon's north pole, just which direction that pole was pointing. That ...


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These are artefacts of how Google shifts between different zoom levels and applies an (incorrect) lighting model to its textured 3D model of the Moon. This is explained here: https://www.metabunk.org/threads/debunked-alien-base-on-the-moon-triangle-of-dots-photo-artifact.2965/ As Mick West says in the above https://www.metabunk.org thread, you can set Global ...


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I want to know why is this, what causes this parameter to have such a strange behaviour. TL;DR: Better observations. Measurements were absolutely lousy before the telescope era, and remained fairly lousy throughout much of the telescope era. It has only been the recent several decades where very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) measurements have made ...


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$ \Delta T $ is dependent upon the rotation of the Earth, which is affected by multiple factors. Some of these factors are known and can be calculated/predicted, such as the gravitational pull of the Moon, the Sun, the planets, etc., but some take place inside the Earth itself: mantle currents, for example, are main contributors. Since we can’t predict or ...


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But: My teacher told me that 13.2 is wrong. I found some dates of when Moon covers Venus and it seems like they happen almost exactly 3 days before and after new Moon. Examples: new Moon - 6. October, covering - 9. October; new Moon - 5. November, covering - 8. November; covering - 28. March, new Moon - 1. April. So why is my solution wrong? First of all ...


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