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This is a way of visualising time dilation due to gravity. A mass like the Earth bends spacetime. In the picture, this is visualised as spacetime getting more stretched out the closer you are to the Earth, shown by the black horizontal lines becoming more spaced out. As uhoh said in his answer, “Time is what is measured with a clock”. On Earth, you measure ...


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I don't think this is feasible, because of two competing effects. To have significant time dilation, the velocity needs to be large. The velocity in a Keplerian orbit of radius $r$ scales as $r^{-1/2}$, so the star would need to be close to the black hole. Tidal forces from the black hole (the difference in gravitational force on the near side vs. far side ...


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We want it so that $1 \text{ year at the speed of x% of c} = \dfrac{10^{10}}{80} \text{ stationary years}$. The Lorentz factor (in terms of c) is $\gamma=\dfrac{1}{\sqrt{1-v^2}}$. Solving for $v$ with $\gamma = \dfrac{10^{10}}{80},$ we get $v=0.999999999999999968c = 299792457.999... \text{m}\cdot\text{s}^{-1}$. This is definitely impossible, as the energy ...


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