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24 votes
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How did Arecibo detect methane lakes on Titan, and image Saturn's rings?

Titan "lakes": Published Open Access in Science: Radar Evidence for Liquid Surfaces on Titan Campbell, D. B., Black, G. J., Carter, L. M., and Ostro, S. J., Science 302, 5644, pp. 431-434, 17 Oct ...
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22 votes
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Why doesn't Titan have a carbon dioxide atmosphere?

The chemistry of Titan's atmosphere is complex, with reactions occurring between carbon dioxide, oxygen, carbon monoxide, hydroxl, and other compounds. This means that carbon dioxide production and ...
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17 votes
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Are there other pictures of Titan surface from Huygens?

One second of googling reveals the whole archive: http://esamultimedia.esa.int/docs/titanraw/index.htm (note you can click onto the strips to inspect them!) The archive depicts the whole decent of ...
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15 votes
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Why does Titan have lower surface gravity than the Moon when Titan is more massive?

Surface gravitational acceleration on an object with mass $M$ and radius $R$ is given by $$ g = \frac{GM}{R^2} \propto G\rho R $$ where $\rho \propto M/R^3$ is the density of the object. If one body ...
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14 votes

Why do certain moons have their rotational period equal to their orbital period?

The answer to this is certainly tidal forces, but that doesn't explain the exact mechanism for how tidal forces result in tidal locking, i.e., an orbiting body showing the same face to the central ...
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12 votes

How did Arecibo detect methane lakes on Titan, and image Saturn's rings?

It did not detect methane lakes. It found that Titan was shiny (in radar terms): that is, the reflections were from a smooth surface rather than a rough one, and at the same time not very intense. ...
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9 votes
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Why the Circumstellar Habitable Zone is defined as it is, if life could be possible outside of it?

From your first link, the definition is: "The circumstellar habitable zone (CHZ), or simply the habitable zone, is the range of orbits around a star within which a planetary surface can support ...
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7 votes
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What causes Titan a moon to have a denser atmosphere than that of a Mars?

Mars and Titan differ markedly in distance from the Sun, composition, and possibly geological activity. Titan is about 6.3 times as remote from the Sun as is Mars, which means Titan receives about 1/...
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5 votes
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How bright would it be on the "face" of Titan

It's not hard to calculated brightness to distance, but that doesn't take into account cloud cover, which is important for Titan. Just looking at distance first, Titan (based on Saturn's distance) ...
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  • 22.9k
5 votes

How would humans with appropriate equipment navigate the surface of Saturn's moon Titan on foot?

I wonder if this would be better for worldbuilding or space travel, but I can touch on the basics. You'd need oxygen and protection from the cold, but a space suit on Titan would be less restrictive, ...
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  • 22.9k
5 votes

Why does Titan's atmosphere not start to burn?

This question is little different from asking why, if the Sun is a ball of Hydrogen, it hasn't already exploded (or burned out). It is difficult for me to take it seriously. But I'll try. Methane ...
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  • 59
5 votes
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When was the diameter of Titan first measured?

Discovery of Titan, 1655: Unknown diameter. Dollfus, 1970: 4,850$\pm$300km (1). Measured by Filar micrometer (2) and diskmeter / double-image micrometer (3). (Apparently a summary of earlier ...
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  • 611
5 votes

For colonization purposes, what is so good about Titan?

There is nowhere in the solar system except for parts of Earth where humans have any hope of surviving without heavy technological support. There is next to no free oxygen anywhere, nowhere has a ...
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  • 9,893
4 votes

Why do rocks on other solar system bodies that have an atmosphere seem to be flat?

I would say that your initial observation is flawed, so the question is moot. Huygens landing site, Titan:
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  • 3,214
4 votes

Can we hear something on Venus, Mars and Titan?

It depends on the composition of the atmosphere. In a helium (or other light gas) atmosphere, your voice would have a higher pitch. If the gasses are heavier, your voice drops. The density is also a ...
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  • 2,956
4 votes
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Is it possible that Titan is a kuiper object captured by Saturn?

Titan is roughly ten times more massive than Pluto or Eris, the most massive known Kuiper Belt objects (KBOs). (Titan is in fact more massive than any other moon in the Solar System except Ganymede.) ...
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  • 14.7k
4 votes
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What does "Active Weather Patterns" mean?

It means that Titan has weather (driven by methane rather than water) and that it's weather changes with the seasons. Cassini has been observing Titan for almost half of a Titan year, which is 29.457 ...
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4 votes
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What would happen to the Galilean moons and Titan if Jupiter and Saturn disappeared?

They might escape from the solar system, if the angles are right. If not, they'll probably wind up in elliptical orbits around the Sun. We'll use a simplifying assumption that the orbits are circular ...
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  • 3,115
3 votes

Is it possible to see Saturn from Titan's surface, day and night?

"since I believe the atmosphere's opacity changes in day time and night time" maybe to a very small factor, somewhere in the upper atmosphere, in the UV-wavelengths where plasma opacities play a role. ...
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3 votes

Why do rocks on other solar system bodies that have an atmosphere seem to be flat?

I don't know what you're talking about. The only one that seems to have mostly flat rocks is Venus. At least based on what little photographs we have from the surface of Venus. Mars Venus
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3 votes

Why do certain moons have their rotational period equal to their orbital period?

The simple answer is: tidal forces, which are a secondary effect of gravity. In the same way that the Moon causes low and high tides of the oceans here on Earth, the Earth also has a similar effect on ...
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3 votes
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Underground sea in Titan(Saturn's moon), water or hydrocarbons?

Titan is believed to have a layer of liquid water under its surface, due to tidal heating of the icy crust. Titan has a surface formed of ices with some hydrocarbon (methane) lakes. The crust of ...
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3 votes
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What color does Titan turn in a lunar eclipse?

It would be dark. Titan in eclipse can be dimly lit by refracted sunlight and light scattered by Saturn's rings. The refracted light would be reddened, but the scattered light would be white. But ...
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  • 88.7k
2 votes
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Available energy for potential life on Titan

I can give a rough answer to your question and some brief thoughts on the paper, and I invite correction from anyone smarter than me. Your article talks about energy per mole, but energy of ...
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  • 22.9k
2 votes

Say we were to bring Titan to Earth's orbit. How much would its atmospheric pressure change?

As Temperature rises, so would the pressure, this would work immediately, as heat from the sun reaches Titan's surface. The atmospheric escape (and thus, pressure loss, as you describe it) would ...
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2 votes
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Did this paper just argue that there is surely life on Titan?

The underlying assumption in the paper is that the planet has water in liquid form. The paper suggests that finding both CO2 and CH4 in the atmosphere of a rocky planet in the "habitable zone" (in ...
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  • 88.7k
2 votes

What if the atmosphere of Titan were like the one on Venus?

One thing to keep in mind is that planet temperature doesn't follow a neat equation when an atmosphere is involved. Without an atmosphere, it's pretty straight forward and there's even an equation ...
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  • 22.9k
2 votes

What if the atmosphere of Titan were like the one on Venus?

If the pressure were the same as the current pressure on Titan, the planet would be slightly warmer for a while, but not for long. The CO2 would soon be frozen out. It is probable that 4 billion years ...
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2 votes
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Is Titan Better or Mars?

We have no practical means to travel to either planet and set up even a base, let alone a colony. As such neither is better. Also note that we have no reason to do it and we would need an extremely ...
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