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According to this source from SOA/NASA Astrophysics Data System on Tidal evolution in the Neptune-Triton system (Chyba, C. F., Jankowski, D. G., & Nicholson, P. D.), Transcript: Many investigators have speculated on the reason for Triton's retrograde orbit. Lyttleton (1936) suggested that both Pluto and Triton originated as prograde satellites of ...


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Tidal circularization is indeed a plausible mechanism for why Triton's orbital eccentricity is so low, and I believe it is in fact the prevailing theory, at the moment. In short, tidal forces from Neptune dissipate energy in Triton's interior, essentially "squeezing" the moon. This results in a loss of orbital kinetic energy. The exact calculations that lead ...


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Triton's orbit is decaying due to tidal interactions, it is predicted to reach Neptune's Roche limit in about 3.6 billion years (Chyba et al., 1989) where it would likely be disrupted, possibly forming a ring system. This timescale is shorter than the timescale for the Sun to become a red giant. Even before that, Triton's orbital decay will bring it into the ...


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Pluto is actually smaller in diameter than Triton, and is also farther away, meaning that Triton covers roughly 1.4x (according to WA) the angle that Pluto does, making occultation that much more probable apriori, ignoring their actual orbits. In addition to the above, New Horizons recently observed Pluto's atmosphere with far more detail than what we can ...


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Converting answer in comment to community wiki Unlikely. Neptune is warmer than Uranus, more internal heat means more turbulent atmosphere. The reason why this is so isn't known, but it's possible that Uranus had a more turbulent past and it emitted heat from its formation more quickly. It's also possible that Neptune had a collision more recently that may ...


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