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I have never worked with SMEI but I do have some experience with photometry and, while I do not understand completely the question, I think I can give you some ideas. First of all, did you get the data from here? If so, depending on what you will use it for it might be a good idea to look for spurious variability and remove it (for example, section 2.2 of ...


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If I understand the question correctly, you have raw data from a CCD sensor in arbitray units (which correlate with brightness) and your challenge is to callibrate this intensity for a certain frequency range. Not knowing much about the SMEI sensor and where on the sky it has been looking at, I struggle to give you a full recipe. If you have for an object ...


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I am the discoverer of delta Velorum's variability (along with the Galileo spacecraft) and I detected those variations visually, so yes, they can be observed, and they are really fun! If you go to the AAVSO VSX page of the star, you have a button called ephemeris that will produce a list of eclipses with their times of beginning - mideclipse - and end. I ...


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Yes it varies in the visible spectrum. The paper The nearby eclipsing stellar system δ Velorum describes why this is difficult target. Surprisingly it is because it is so bright. The absolute brightness of a star will vary significantly due to absorbtion in the atmosphere. If the sky is slightly hazy, then the stars will be dimmer. To measure the ...


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This is a partial answer based on the discussion in comments below the question. If one already has an "amplitude spectrum" and one wants to convert to a power spectrum, all you have to do is take the absolute value of the amplitude and square it. In Python (introduced in the question) that's just np.abs(amplitude)**2. When you take the Discrete ...


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