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3

The Moon orbits the Earth in such a way that it sometimes can be on the opposite side of the Earth as seen from the Sun. In other words, it’s possible to have Sun-Earth-Moon along an imaginary straight line, in that order. However, by Ptolemy’s time, it had already been noticed that Venus is always seen close to the Sun (maximum angular distance about 47°). ...


-1

The moon's orbit is most certainly not "in its entirety between the Earth and the Sun"! A little more than half the time, it is further away from the Sun than the Earth is. As you will realise if you give it a little thought.


7

This web page -- "Here is why the Hubble Space Telescope only looked a few times at Venus (and why it looked at the Moon instead)" -- seems like a pretty good answer to your main question (note: "MAST" = Mukulski Archive for Space Telescopes): There are only a few times the Hubble Space Telescope did look to Venus according to MAST. ...


0

All planets lose a small amount of atmospheric gases due to some atoms/molecules (even neutral ones) having an energy high enough to escape the gravitational field of the planet. This tends to affect lighter elements more as they have higher velocities at the same temperature. This kind of thermal 'outgassing' is in principle the same as that producing the '...


4

From going through the literature the paper by Wang et al. 2021 is citing, I am nearly certain that the term "Earth wind" must be a recent invention, perhaps by those authors themselves. It is however correct to call the solar wind a 'wind'. This is because a wind is a pressure-driven bulk motion of a collectively coupled gas. The solar wind, at ...


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