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The best current answer is "We can't". We do not presently know of any way to stabilize wormholes without large negative energy densities. (Some argue that even that isn't enough, but I don't believe that the matter is settled, even on a theoretical level.) Note that: (a) No wormhole has ever been observed, nor have we observed anything which is a ...


5

A wormhole is, in theory, a 'tunnel' which would be a shortcut to another point in spacetime. There's a Wikipedia article on the subject: A wormhole, also known as an Einstein–Rosen bridge, is a hypothetical topological feature of spacetime that would be, fundamentally, a "shortcut" through spacetime. For a simple visual explanation of a wormhole, ...


5

Short answer: We haven't because there is no imaginable way to do it with current technology nor with any vaguely plausible extension of it. There are two fundamental problems and some technical ones: Space is stiff. You can measure the stiffness of a material by measuring the energy that it takes to bend it. Applying that same approach to measuring the "...


4

Wormholes are a theoretical solution to Einstein's equations, but, unlike black holes, they have never been observed and probably don't exist. If they did exist, they would almost immediately close due to the presence of matter in them. To stop them from closing you would need some "exotic matter" with remarkable properties, like "negative mass". Exotic ...


4

The idea of wormholes is completely abstract. We have no evidence they actually exist and they are a result of following the strict mathematics of general relativity to and beyond it's intended limits. When you push a theory past it's "design limits" you can't expect the results to be valid. Sometimes they are, sometimes they aren't. for me curvature ...


4

A wormhole is a theorised phenomenon that would, if they exist, connect two different parts of space-time. A common analogy for the wormhole is to represent space-time as a two-dimensional sheet. If the two-dimensional sheet is bended over so that two points touch each other, than the point of contact becomes a wormhole. This has been suggested as a way to ...


3

We don't know. The Multiverse Theory is really just a hypothethis; sure, it makes sense, but it cannot be scientifically proven. We really have no reason to doubt that this is our only universe. Wormholes are just as hypothetical, since they would require infinite energy or negative energy to be created, neither of which we can get. Also, keep in mind that ...


3

The concept of a wormhole is, of course, highly speculative. None the less, such a phenomenon could take many forms - most simple something which to outside observers looks like a blackhole on each end of the wormhole. Alternatively, a traversable wormhole (see for example Morris & Thorne 1988; which has the same basic topology but no horizon), could ...


3

One plausible way of detecting wormholes (paper) is gravitational microlensing. Light paths are bent by the curved spacetime around the wormhole, similar to what happens near black holes. As a wormhole moves in front of background stars it can cause the brightness to vary in a characteristic way, making it possible to distinguish it from a black hole. One ...


2

Around the worm hole would be a region with an intense gravitational field, and there would be gravitational lensing occurring, similar to that around a black hole. The difference would be that light that has passed through the worm hole would would be visible. So, a distorted view of the "other side" could be seen. This physicsbuzz article has some images ...


1

The latter is closest to the truth, although I wouldn't use the phrasing "stretch". The "mouths" of the wormhole are (more or less) fixed in comoving coordinates (i.e. the coordinate system that expands with the Universe, and in which galaxies lie approximately still). But the bridge is sort of outside our three-dimensional space, and doesn't necessarily ...


1

A wormhole, or Einstein-Rosen bridge, is inherently unstable. It will collapse before anything can traverse it. Keeping it stable enough for even a photon to get through requires negative energy densities. And that requires exotic and suspicious new physics in most cases. Technically there are well-known effects which can produce negative energy densities, ...


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