Warrick
  • Member for 7 years, 9 months
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  • Birmingham, UK
Which stars have been named after astronomers?
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2 votes

You probably need someone better versed in the history of astronomy than me, but I'll give it a stab. As you've already noticed, the Wikipedia article on stars named after people has some entries, ...

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Why was this asteroid (4864 Nimoy) chosen to be named after Leonard Nimoy?
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2 votes

I'm not entirely sure, but I would guess that it's simply because the discoverer suggested it. After a few steps in the process of characterizing an asteroid's orbit, the discoverer gets to suggest a ...

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How to calculate magnitude of a star in a triple star system?
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2 votes

Basically you need to convert between luminosities (which you can add) and magnitudes using $$M-M_\odot=-2.5\log_{10}(L/L_\odot)$$ Let's call the total luminosity $L_0$ and magnitude $M_0$ and the ...

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Do astronomers and astrophysicists more often use diameters or radii when discussing about planets, dwarf planets, exoplanets and stars?
2 votes

Definitely radii, with one notable exception... When observers talk about how large an object is on the sky, they usually discuss angular size, which is related to the diameter of an object, not the ...

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Without using absolute magnitudes or isochrones, how might we tell a star's age and evolutionary status?
2 votes

I'm no expert on stellar atmospheres, so I have a limited idea of how things like $\log g$ affect the lines. But I work with stellar models, so I can take a stab at that part. The overall principle ...

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How/where to check where the Sun is (constellation)?
1 votes

In this case, Wolfram|Alpha has you covered. For example, look at the result for "which constellation was the Sun in Jan 1 1400". That said, I'm not sure this calculate includes the precession of ...

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Conflicting information about the star Delta Pavonis?
1 votes

I haven't looked in too much detail, but the first point is to note that there are two estimates of the age: 6.6–6.9 Gyr and 9.3 Gyr. The latter is given without uncertainties, but I looked it up on ...

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Can objects enter hydrostatic equillibrium through processes other than the influence of gravity?
1 votes

Strictly speaking (as far as I know), hydrostatic equilibrium applies whenever a fluid balances external body forces with the pressure gradient. From Wikipedia: In continuum mechanics, a fluid is ...

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Where might a semi proficient amateur analyst participate in meaningful astronomical efforts
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I haven't managed to formulate a coherent single answer, but here are several suggestions for where to find some hints of current topical research where you might be able to contribute. Open source ...

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