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30

This NASA page says this photo was taken on April 28 2006. Using Celestia, I managed to find the picture from Cassini that best lines up with the photo. It doesn't match up precisely, but that's to be expected as the calculated orbital elements of all these moons (and cassini) in the software won't necessarily match up to reality precisely. Below is the ...


13

The JPL Solar System Simulator doesn't show Epimetheus but does show Titan behind the Encke gap at 2006-04-28 08:12 UTC. The simulated surface texture is probably composed of VIMS images in infrared wavelengths where Titan's atmosphere is relatively transparent. On the real Titan, haze scatters visible light so strongly that the surface is indistinct and ...


6

note: This is a supplemental answer adding some details to @ Ingolifs' excellent answer. At roughly 2006-Apr-28 08:30 UTC Cassini was both 1,800,000 km from Titan and 667,000 km from Epimetheus at the same time. I used JPL's Horizons and saved the positions in the Saturn body centered coordinates every 5 minutes then ran the python script below to plot. I ...


3

This is a hard question to answer without hard numbers. When you look at this image, you can clearly see that the refractive power of the atmosphere changes as you look closer to the limb of Saturn. The rings start off being refracted slightly, then get more refracted as you get closer to the limb. That essentially implies the portion of the ring closer to ...


3

It means that Titan has weather (driven by methane rather than water) and that it's weather changes with the seasons. Cassini has been observing Titan for almost half of a Titan year, which is 29.457 times longer than is our year. Titan's weather patterns (where it's cloudy, where it rains) has visibly changed over this time, just as weather patterns here ...


3

Iorio (Preliminary constraints on the location of Telisto/Planet Nine from planetary orbital dynamics) has suggested transmissions from the New Horizons probe (currently beyond Pluto) could be used to test for the influence of the proposed new planet, and provide constraints to its possible position. It is estimated that the position of New Horizons could ...


2

You are correct that the main way to determine planetary surface ages is through crater dating. This comes in two versions, relative and absolute dating. Both require counting the number of craters per area and so you need good resolution imaging since the number of impactors and craters follow a power-law (more small impactors/craters than large). It then ...


1

I suppose it is the Saturn system's barycenter which has been located gravitationally. At this level of precision I suppose that the moons', especially Titan's tidal effects must be considered. ..., so I wonder if these too are being considered at the 4 km precision level, and overall exactly how the point located is defined? Short answer: No. As pointed ...


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