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Questions tagged [rogue-planet]

Questions about planets that do not orbit around a star. These planets travel through space.

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How can planets ionize in the distant future in 10^100 years if proton decay doesn't happen?

So imagine there is a very massive planet with 20 times the mass of Earth made of mostly iron and silicon and has 2 times the radius of Earth so has a high escape velocity and this object exists ...
MiltonTheMeme's user avatar
3 votes
0 answers
94 views

If a rogue planet entered near Jupiter planet could it tear the planet apart?

Theoretically, there could be a rogue planet made of iron or even osmium in large quantities, which can make it have 25 Earth masses within the volume of 1 Earth Radii. So if this object came near ...
MiltonTheMeme's user avatar
3 votes
2 answers
99 views

How would we tell the difference between low mass objects that formed by direct collapse or in an accretion disk?

In this question about rogue planet/sub brown detection there are a couple of comments about classification of non-stellar, low mass, free floating objects. Part of one of the answers is - Some "...
Futoque's user avatar
  • 133
5 votes
1 answer
100 views

"And in some cases, a (free floating) planet (FFP) can form on its own outside of any solar system." Cool! But what are those cases?

The April 2, 2023 Inverse article 9 Years Ago, Astronomers Found Two Rogue Planets — But They Didn’t Realize It Until Now says: Planets are typically part of a planetary system and are ...
uhoh's user avatar
  • 30.6k
-4 votes
2 answers
697 views

What is the chance that the Sun will not rise tomorrow?

What is the most likely natural astrophysical mechanism for the "Sun not rising tomorrow", consistent with our scientific knowledge today? Background The "sunrise problem - What is the ...
David Bailey's user avatar
2 votes
0 answers
49 views

Is there likely any star systems in the very middle of the largest voids?

I imagine this question is as old Hubble's red shift measurements publication. Has there been enough time for any solar system to make it right to the middle of a void? Any Goldilocks scenarios there? ...
Rabbi Kaii's user avatar
12 votes
3 answers
3k views

How much light would be received on a rogue planet close to the galactic center?

I was wondering if anyone has ever attempted to estimate how much solar radiation would be received on a rogue planet floating in between star systems close to the center of the milky way, compared to ...
Schquestoning's user avatar
8 votes
3 answers
206 views

Would a nearby "Orphan planet" be detectable?

I understand that there may be large numbers of "orphan" planets not circling any star. If there were such a planet, say the size of Jupiter, in the vicinity of the Sun, about how close ...
Mike Stone's user avatar
11 votes
1 answer
1k views

Are there any probabilistic models for the likelihood of finding a rogue planet closer to us than Proxima Centauri?

There are some articles that claim there could be more rogue planets than stars in our galaxy such as this one. Now if this were true one might expect that there is a rogue planet closer to the earth ...
Sidharth Ghoshal's user avatar
1 vote
2 answers
207 views

Astrophysics Ph.D. thesis on intergalactic rogue planets and their habitability; how active is this field of research?

Is the habitability of intergalactic rogue planets something that has been studied a lot? The reason that I'm asking is that I've just started my PhD program last year and I'm wondering/concerned if ...
figureskater's user avatar
3 votes
3 answers
510 views

Are planets far from their parent star more likely or less likely to have an atmosphere?

Are non-gaseous planets (e.g. super-Earths) that are either rogue or very far from their parent star(s) less likely or more likely to have a significant atmosphere? On one hand planets closer to their ...
Giovanni-Reinstate Ceres Pluto's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
70 views

What can be the minimum time for a somewhat stable twin star orbit to collapse on being affected by a third body?

The third 'invading' celestial body passing by or crashing into one of the stars could be a possible reason for the orbit collapse. Something that throws the stars* off-course speeding up their death ...
Glitch's user avatar
  • 121
1 vote
0 answers
88 views

Is it likely there are more rogue planets than brown dwarfs, and that we just can't see them because they're too dim?

Among celestial bodies revolving around the galactic center directly, it seems the bodies of lowest mass (brown and red dwarfs) are the most abundant. However, when it comes to even less massive Y-...
John's user avatar
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8 votes
3 answers
3k views

Could rogue planets harbor life?

On July 21 at 10 am, Seti Talks will be discussing the topic of "Could Rogue Planets Harbor Life". Supposedly there are 50 billion such planets in the Milky Way. I would think that the ...
Peter U's user avatar
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1 vote
0 answers
49 views

Couldn't the orbits of ETNOs have been altered by a flying-by rogue planet as well?

Regarding the Extreme trans-Neptunian objects or ETNOs, whose orbits some believe are elongated by a far away planet, could their orbits have been elongated by a rogue planet as well? Is it possible ...
John's user avatar
  • 1,538
13 votes
3 answers
2k views

Are Brown and Sub-Brown Dwarfs secretly more common than stars?

I recently heard that Red Dwarfs are the most common type of star, and low-mass Red Dwarfs are the most common type of Red Dwarf. This seems to imply a generic trend that the lower the mass, the more ...
cowlinator's user avatar
18 votes
6 answers
7k views

If the Sun disappeared, could some planets form a new orbital system?

If the sun were to suddenly disappear, the planets would continue to travel tangentially to their former orbits. (This I know from this answer to a somewhat related question here.) In such a scenario, ...
Psychonaut's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
267 views

Scholarly work on the gravitational disruption of a rocky planet by a close pass with another planet?

note: While the apparently abandoned question Effects of a rogue planet passing between the Earth and the Moon? (inspired by Thundarr the Barbarian) asks for speculation and was answered with it, this ...
Roger Wood's user avatar
  • 1,359
3 votes
0 answers
151 views

Hydrogen Frost Line? Where, if anywhere, is it cold enough for Oort Cloud objects or rogue planets to have solid hydrogen on their surfaces?

I like the idea of Oort Cloud objects all being crusted with a thin layer of hydrogen snow, though what little information I've managed to find on the topic seems to imply that that is unlikely, ...
Mr. Nichan's user avatar
5 votes
2 answers
440 views

When was the concept of rogue planets first theorized?

So after watching the Kurzgesagt video about life on rogue planets I became fascinated by the concept. I did some digging, and the earliest reference to the concept I could find was Philip Wylie's ...
KingOfEphrya's user avatar
-1 votes
1 answer
199 views

If the hypothetical planet beyond the Kuiper belt exists, is it likely there are even more planets farther outside?

Since 2016 there are hints that a (probably) ice giant planet may exist far beyond the Kuiper belt. There are speculations that it may be a rogue planet captured by the Sun. But is it likely that ...
user30007's user avatar
  • 1,226
0 votes
1 answer
226 views

Would it be possible for life found on moon of rogue planet

I have heard that there are at least three Basic requirement for life exist in the universe, they are: Source of Energy Complex chemistry (including solvent/medium for chemical reaction) Protection ...
C.Calvert's user avatar
  • 101
0 votes
1 answer
329 views

Is it possible that Venus was once a rogue planet? [closed]

As Venus rotates in clockwise direction, while other planets rotate in anti clockwise direction: Is it possible that Venus was once a rogue planet?
Karanveer Singh's user avatar
10 votes
3 answers
5k views

How well would the Moon protect the Earth from an Asteroid?

Would the Earth fare better if the Moon blocked the meteor, comet, rogue planet, or otherwise rather than a direct impact? At what point would the Moon's debris would be an extinction event? The ...
Muze's user avatar
  • 1
2 votes
0 answers
87 views

What would happen to the atmosphere of a rogue jovian planet?

Let's say we have a gas giant composed primarily of hydrogen and hydrogen-rich molecules that is ejected from its star system. As this planet embarks on its potentially infinite journey out into the ...
White Dwarf's user avatar
4 votes
3 answers
657 views

What would you find within a void?

I'm aware that voids are relatively empty regions of the universe, but just how empty can they be? Wikipedia states that voids have 'few or no' galaxies, but I can't find much else. To make my ...
guest's user avatar
  • 143
1 vote
2 answers
239 views

What natural mechanisms could lead to the unlikely case of the same rogue asteroid or planet passing through our solar system twice?

I find he following answer to the question What's the soonest Oumuamua could return? unsatisfying and oversimplifying and the last five words "Therefore it will never return." unsupported at a minimum....
uhoh's user avatar
  • 30.6k
3 votes
2 answers
136 views

Can rogue/nomad planets and other starless planetary bodies orbit each other in a stable system?

Nomad planets (also called planemos or rogues planets) which drift in space without a star or substellar object to orbit. The majority of such planets we have discovered are gas planets with thick ...
Nirvana's user avatar
  • 251
5 votes
3 answers
511 views

Can two planets in an empty universe meet/be pulled together?

For this question assume that the entire universe is completely empty. The universe is not expanding or contracting, it is completely motionless since time immemorial and has never moved before. Only ...
Tom Sol's user avatar
  • 437
2 votes
1 answer
254 views

Could a rocky rogue planet get trapped in the orbit between Earth and Mars?

I know it's extremely unlikely a rogue planet passing by there, and I know the size of rocky planets can vary a lot (IIRC there is a rocky planet 5 times the size of Earth) but in any hypothetical ...
Pablo's user avatar
  • 1,113
7 votes
0 answers
221 views

Detecting a Rogue Planet from Earth

This is for a novel. A rogue planet, is, by a one-in-a-zillion freak chance, on its way to collide with Earth. It has been drifting in interstellar space since its original formation (billions of ...
EvilSnack's user avatar
3 votes
1 answer
376 views

Effects of a rogue planet passing between the Earth and the Moon?

The plot of Thundarr the Barbarian got me thinking about the science behind the passage of a runaway planet between the Earth and the Moon and its effect on the Earth and Moon themselves, as well ...
Qozağacı's user avatar
11 votes
2 answers
288 views

Are rogue planets ever born in isolation?

I'm using the term "rogue planet" here loosely to mean anything of planet-level mass that is not orbiting around a star. Popular discussions of these objects always describe them as forming around a ...
Mark Foskey's user avatar
  • 3,916
4 votes
1 answer
615 views

Is it likely that intergalactic stars would still retain their planets?

Given that we've discovered hundreds of intergalactic stars (IGs), and that most stars have planets, what do we know about the likelihood of IGs retaining their planets after being ejected from their ...
joseph.hainline's user avatar
2 votes
0 answers
108 views

Life in sufficiently hot rogue planets [closed]

The Milky Way has a bright center we can't see directly because of space dust. Are there's regions of the galaxy free of that dust that could receive all that light and radiation, right? Would it be ...
Osias Jota's user avatar
5 votes
1 answer
206 views

Studies on planets without parent star

I am interested in studies and/or publications about planets that wander in space and are not orbiting around a star or its remnants. These dark and frozen worlds should've got ripped away from their ...
Vladislavs Dovgalecs's user avatar
3 votes
1 answer
1k views

What is the closest heavenly body to our solar system

What is currently the closest known heavenly body, brown dwarf, rogue planet or other to our solar system? At one time it was Alpha Centauri.
P Pitch's user avatar
  • 89
3 votes
2 answers
485 views

Can a planet with a hydrogen atmosphere have a water ocean with dissolved oxygen? [closed]

Reading up on rogue planets (i. e. planets not orbiting a star), it turns out that a rogue Super-Earth with a sufficiently dense hydrogen atmosphere could retain its internal heat and have oceans/...
pablodf76's user avatar
  • 502
5 votes
1 answer
174 views

How can we tell the age of a rogue planet?

Is it possible to find out how old is a planet, especially a rogue planet? I know that people measured the radioactive decays to determine Earth's age with some amazing accuracy, but what about ...
user6760's user avatar
  • 2,503
3 votes
2 answers
246 views

Has the existence of earth-sized rogue planets been confirmed?

The list of known rogue planets provided by Wikipedia is fairly short. Some are "candidates"; others "may be" red dwarfs. The two confirmed rogue planets are several times the size of Jupiter. I ...
Ricky's user avatar
  • 1,345
4 votes
3 answers
298 views

Is it possible that a star system ejects an object out of the galaxy?

I know it is possible that a star system ejects a planet out of the star system and the planets becomes rogue planets and orbit around the galaxy. Is it also possible that a planet gains enough speed ...
Gstestso's user avatar
  • 2,209
0 votes
2 answers
147 views

Survival on a rogue planet [closed]

Are there any planets not orbiting a celestial body which can support life despite the temperature? Also what is the absolute minimum temperature that life can survive in?
Psy's user avatar
  • 3
1 vote
2 answers
204 views

Can a rogue planet neither orbit around a star nor a galaxy?

As we know, rogue planets don't orbit around a star, how about galaxy? Can a rouge planet not orbit around a galaxy?
Gstestso's user avatar
  • 2,209
10 votes
2 answers
873 views

Is there any hard evidence that rogue planets exist?

A rogue planet (or a rogue anything, for that matter: a celestial body other than a star) is something that's drifting through space without being attached by gravity to any star. They're just out ...
Ricky's user avatar
  • 1,345
2 votes
3 answers
6k views

When the sun explodes, will some of the planets in the Solar System survive and become rogue planets?

Say if a large enough star, that has a number of planets, were to explode in a supernova: Would any of the planets survive? Would they become rogue planets?
CipherBot's user avatar
  • 1,301
3 votes
2 answers
588 views

How do rogue planets orbit around stars in other planetary systems?

I got some interesting answers for What would happen if a rogue planet hit one of the planets in our Solar System? But I have seen some documentaries that state that rogue planets from other ...
user3278897's user avatar
4 votes
3 answers
3k views

What would happen if a rogue planet hit one of the planets in our Solar System?

As there are millions of rogue planets in the Milky Way, what would happen if one hit a planet in the Solar System. For example, if the rogue planet hit Pluto, would Pluto fall in to the Sun due to ...
user3278897's user avatar
8 votes
2 answers
360 views

Could Pluto and Charon have extra-Solar origin?

Pluto and Charon seem to have surprisingly young surfaces, considering that resurfacing events were expected to be rare for them. Could the explanation be that they actually are young? Formed later ...
LocalFluff's user avatar
  • 11.4k
2 votes
1 answer
143 views

Configuration required to tidally heat Earth-like rogue planet

Could it be possible for Earth-like rogue planet to maintain large bodies of liquid water on the surface without a sun by relying mostly on tidal forces of a moon (or multiple moons). How big/far/fast ...
Mirac7's user avatar
  • 139
6 votes
3 answers
4k views

What would the night sky look like if Earth orbited an intergalactic star?

If the Earth and its host star were located exactly in-between the Milky Way and Andromeda would the night sky be completely void of light? Would stars be visible to the unaided eye? So there could ...
Declan Konroyd's user avatar